Author Topic: How much is too much reducing agent  (Read 27784 times)

Offline RickinWI

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #15 on: November 02, 2014, 07:19:17 PM »
Yes, in general that is what I will be doing from now on. Except for the next batch that I will be doing for experimental purposes.  Have to make sure I haven't lost my ability to screw up a batch.  I used to be really good at it.  :)
So many VARIABLES & so little TIME.

Ricplate

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #16 on: May 05, 2015, 01:09:36 PM »
Good morning! is more effective after reducing agent added process to heat it up colloidal silver in the microwave? or boiling in a plate? for 3 litres I put then just 6 drops? korn syrup? thank you

Offline kephra

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2015, 02:00:22 PM »
Heating it up makes the conversion from ionic to metallic faster.  I heat mine up for a couple minutes in my microwave, and the conversion takes just a few minutes.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

Ricplate

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #18 on: May 05, 2015, 02:06:21 PM »
thank you Kephra! everything is working just fine ...even colloidal gold! thank you so much for all your help and knowledge

Offline peri1224

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2015, 02:26:00 PM »
One observation to the reduction of the ions. I electrolyze a liter of DW, supposedly for 18 mins. for 20 ppm, at 26-30C, which is ambient temperature here. But I let it run for 23 mins. without any problems.
Then I slow boil it with the heater/stirrer (same model Kephra shows sometimes) to boiling temp. The heat alone reduces only up to a very pale yellow. After adding a drop of glucose the pale yellow turns to full 20+ ppm golden yellow color in a second, crystal clear. I always got very good results like this, with the color on the greenish side, which means small particles.
Sometimes it happened that after dropping in the glucose, the color went to orange for few seconds before returning to yellow, but on the reddish side, which means slightly bigger particles.
Will now try to "graduate" to 320 ppm with gelatin, where heat seems to be required during the electrolysis process.

Handyguy

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2016, 02:52:32 AM »
My colloidal silver is starting to taste metallic. When first made, two weeks ago, there was no taste at all.
What's happening?

Offline Art

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2016, 04:44:34 AM »
Metallic taste usually means a high ionic silver content. What color is your Colloidal Silver? What and how much reducer did you use?

Art

Handyguy

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2016, 02:33:01 PM »
I followed Kephra's recipe to the letter. The solution was a medium amber but turned to  yellow.
Could this be not enough reducer?

Offline kephra

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2016, 03:37:27 PM »
Post exactly what you did and what you used.  I have never heard of nor seen this happen.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

Offline WayneInPHX

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #24 on: June 21, 2016, 06:37:40 AM »
Rick, I would use Kephra's idea of using HYDRION PH paper and bring your electrolyte to 8.5 PH per his instructions:

More electrolyte = less plateout and using the recommended amount puts the pH in its optimal sweet spot of 8.5

CHECK:  2) The Making of Colloidal Silver -- Part 2 - Production Techniques
"Mix up the sodium carbonate by dissolving 1 level tablespoon in 3 ounces of water.*

Starting with 1 liter of water, add 20 drops of sodium carbonate solution.  Sodium carbonate is what you get when you bake baking soda, so you have consumed a lot of this in your life, and it is not toxic.  Mix well."

You can get the paper cheap at Amazon, search for:  Hydrion PH 4.5 - 8.5 Paper Cat#2210  It will be TONS easier to use the paper instead of a actual PH "Meter"  The meter requires cal solutions and storage wet.  A PAIN.

I admit, I am a bit psychopathic about minutiae when I get an interest in something.  I apologize ahead of time.  :P

The only thing (I) would add is to start by adding just 15 drops of solution and then 1 at a time measuring in between to ensure you actually get 8.5 PH  Your Distilled water can have a different PH in every bottle. Don't try to change the ratio or simply add  the Sodium Carbonate directly.  VERY small amounts make LARGE changes!  I worked out his ratio's. The amount of my Sodium Carbonate powder in a single drop of solution is only .003 GRAMS!!!!!  It is NOT MUCH!  It's about the amount of "dust" left on my weighing paper after I make a solution!  THAT I suspect is why he has you make it in a 3 oz solution!  It is forgiving and simple.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2016, 10:26:32 AM by WayneInPHX »
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Frank

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #25 on: July 02, 2016, 11:34:27 PM »
Hi,

I would like to ask a few questions relating to the color of colloidal silver, I made my first batch yesterday which came out to the same color as in the pictures in this topic which is great, but I like to be objective in my research of making colloidal silver and came across this e-book today, I'd like your opinion on it please because it seems to be from a valid source but is contradicting what is being said here, so my question is, which is the right way to make it and if this information is wrong why is it wrong? I'd like you to pay particular attention to pages 14 to 25 and especially page 24 http://www.silver-colloids.com/Book/SilverColloids-s.pdf

I'd like to learn how to make it without having doubts about what I am making and this professor is putting doubts in my mind, so is there anyway you can put my mind at ease about this?

Offline kephra

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #26 on: July 02, 2016, 11:47:13 PM »
Well that article is in direct disagreement with all the published science data.  For one thing, the color of colloidal silver does not come from reflected light.  It comes from absorbing light.  Particles which reflect light are indeed too large, however thats not what gives colloidal silver of the right size range its color.  Look up surface plasmon resonance and that will tell you how it actually works.  I have already explained this in the articles.

Researches qualify silver nanoparticles by the wavelength of light they absorb.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

Frank

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #27 on: July 03, 2016, 12:24:47 AM »
Ok thanks

I found this and it answered some things for me http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/materials-science/nanomaterials/silver-nanoparticles.html

I'd like to ask you a few more questions about nanoparticles, what size is best for making colloidal silver, and, what size does your generator produce at 20ppm and also is there anyway that the particle size can be measured at home without lab equipment and such?

Offline kephra

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #28 on: July 03, 2016, 12:46:04 AM »
The answers are in the Articles section.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

Offline Dean

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2016, 08:24:55 PM »
I know this an old post but as a newbie, and learning the importance of these very specific elements, could someone tell me if it's OK to add electrolyte after electrolysis if ph is low or must it be correct at the start of the run? If the effect of too high or too low affects reducing, it seems logical to me that I could check after the run and adjust to be sure the ph was ok before then adding reducer.

(Or is that too simplistic?).

I only say that as I have 500ml batch running at the moment and have only just come across all this ph stuff so didn't check prior to starting the run.

I only have a SOTA silver pulser at the moment ( til the elite turns up) and it says in the manual that it only generates 1mA.

I've calculated the run time using Kephra's calcs but as this is only a 9volt device I have no idea if the MA is correct. When I put a multimeter on the electrodes I get no reading at all for Amps or volts.

I can't therefore see if moving the cathode affects the current.

The current setup (as I understand it is:

500ml x 10 (PPM) x 0.015 / 1 (mA) = 75 mins
The SOTA device says nothing about moving the cathode so I have assumed that it is 1mA when both wires are about an inch off the bottom.

I'll test ph after the run now (which has just finished) but not sure what it should be for best results.
If it's low, then this is why I'm thinking I could add electrolyte now before reducing.

Grateful for thoughts.

Dean