Author Topic: How much is too much reducing agent  (Read 30491 times)

Offline kephra

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #45 on: November 24, 2016, 09:18:24 PM »
Kephra,

  Does the ppm meter you sell at the SilverTron Store measure the conductivity?

Bobby
Yes, it is both an EC meter and ppm meter.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

plataoplomo

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #46 on: December 08, 2016, 08:03:43 AM »
Water PH varies

I don't know if this has been mentioned before but.......

Distilled water is acidic because it absorbs carbon from the atmosphere.  You can drive out the extra carbon by boiling at a rolling boil for 15 minutes then sealing it while still steaming in an airtight container.  Use a glass or stainless steel pot to boil in.

The PH difference between boiled and not boiled is striking.

We use mason jars.  If the jar vacuum seals when it cools, (it usually does unless your canning flat is bad), the distilled water remain alkaline, (less dissolved carbon).

I learned this while researching how to make electrolyte for large Nickel Cadmium cells used in my solar system.

Hope this helps someone.

Offline kephra

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #47 on: December 08, 2016, 12:38:24 PM »
The solubility of CO2 decreases with temperature, so boiling would drive off most of it.  However, this is unnecessary when using sodium carbonate for electrolyte and its time consuming and uses up a lot of energy.

For reducing agents, there are lots of choices include, glucose, maltose, maltodextrin, cinnamon extract, other plant extracts, corn syrup (Karo), Tate & Lyles golden syrup etc.

The silver lungs guy tries to get you to buy his expensive reducing agent, but its just a carbohydrate like one of the above. 
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

Offline WayneInPHX

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #48 on: February 14, 2017, 05:32:02 AM »
Water PH varies
The PH difference between boiled and not boiled is striking.

The focus is: Getting the molarity of sodium carbonate in your solution correct. The MATH proves out what it will be.  Your PH measuring method whatever it may be, will NOT be as accurate.  The PH is important, sure, but if you are measuring correct amounts, measuring PH absolutely becomes irrelevant.

If I follow my own advise, Pure Distilled Water, Pure Sodium Carbonate(Anhydrous) all measured out correctly, and it comes back PH 8, or 9.3, etc, the PH measuring is in error.
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gandolf

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #49 on: March 08, 2017, 11:39:12 PM »
Water PH varies
The PH difference between boiled and not boiled is striking.

The focus is: Getting the molarity of sodium carbonate in your solution correct. The MATH proves out what it will be.  Your PH measuring method whatever it may be, will NOT be as accurate.  The PH is important, sure, but if you are measuring correct amounts, measuring PH absolutely becomes irrelevant.

If I follow my own advise, Pure Distilled Water, Pure Sodium Carbonate(Anhydrous) all measured out correctly, and it comes back PH 8, or 9.3, etc, the PH measuring is in error.

If you really want to have fun.  Boil the distilled water under a vacuum of say 0.1 ATM (cheapest vacuum pump).  With a little time that will remove all those dissolved gases too  ;D  If you are good you can probably put the meter or calibrated probe part in the vacuum too since electronics does not care.


Offline WayneInPHX

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #50 on: March 12, 2017, 11:28:11 PM »
Water PH varies
The PH difference between boiled and not boiled is striking.

The focus is: Getting the molarity of sodium carbonate in your solution correct. The MATH proves out what it will be.  Your PH measuring method whatever it may be, will NOT be as accurate.  The PH is important, sure, but if you are measuring correct amounts, measuring PH absolutely becomes irrelevant.

If I follow my own advise, Pure Distilled Water, Pure Sodium Carbonate(Anhydrous) all measured out correctly, and it comes back PH 8, or 9.3, etc, the PH measuring is in error.

If you really want to have fun.  Boil the distilled water under a vacuum of say 0.1 ATM (cheapest vacuum pump).  With a little time that will remove all those dissolved gases too  ;D  If you are good you can probably put the meter or calibrated probe part in the vacuum too since electronics does not care.


MY game is the minutia.
Nit-picking to perfection.


The Guides will tell you how to make repeatable high quality stuff EVERY time.
MY bag is splitting the hairs to get to the minimum amount of Reducer / Stabilizer per batch that results in perfect clarity, color, stability.  I am MUCH further than just 2 months ago.
Most of us don’t listen with the intent to understand.  We listen with the intent to reply.  -  From a TED Talk

"I've decided I'm not old. I'm 25 plus shipping & handling!"

Offline nix2p

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Re: How much is too much reducing agent
« Reply #51 on: March 19, 2020, 12:31:07 AM »

Sometimes when I forget about electrolyte mixture, This thread is reminding me how is done correctly. :-[

I wish I stumbled on it in my early days...

Another thread that concerns the purity of silver rod:
 https://www.thoughtco.com/flame-test-colors-photo-gallery-4053133

Thanks Kep...
"I am too old to die young, and too young to grow up"!
Marty Feldman