Author Topic: cleaning anodes  (Read 2428 times)

SanchoPanza

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cleaning anodes
« on: June 10, 2015, 06:22:42 PM »
How often must the anode be cleaned?
I will be using wire, to make the cleaning easier, but how often?
And what happens when its all black?

-Sancho

Offline wgpeters

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Re: cleaning anodes
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2015, 06:37:09 PM »
Fire clean it each time.  The black stuff is undissolved silver oxide that will eventually flake off and contaminate your colloidal silver.
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SanchoPanza

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Re: cleaning anodes
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2015, 07:13:18 PM »
I was kind of figuring that it was silver oxide.
I wasn't counting on cleaning after each batch though.
I thought a  wire anode would make cleaning a little easier, but If I gotta fire up the torch anyway, it's a horse apiece, eh?
Does too much oxide inhibit the electrolysis, or is it just the threat of chunks?

Thanks,
-Sancho

Offline kephra

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Re: cleaning anodes
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2015, 09:50:54 PM »
Quote
Does too much oxide inhibit the electrolysis, or is it just the threat of chunks?
If there is too much, it raises the electrical resistance between anode and water requiring a higher voltage, but it takes a lot.

I clean mine on my gas range.

Of course you can scrub it off with a plastic scrubbee if you want, but that wastes silver.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

SanchoPanza

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Re: cleaning anodes
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2015, 01:15:22 AM »
Gas stove sounds even easier than the torch.   ;)
I don't like the scrubbing idea either.

Is the oxide produced through EL the same as the tarnish that forms naturally on my silverware?
Any idea how much additional voltage would be required, with a really dirty anode?
Just curious, as I'm making a note to measure it for myself after a few runs.

-Sancho

Offline kephra

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Re: cleaning anodes
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2015, 01:26:29 AM »
The tarnish on silverware is silver sulfide, from sulfur ions in the air, or from sulfur containing foods.

The voltage change from the silver oxide will depend on how much, but will be volts, not tens of volts.  Thats one of the reasons why a good constant current supply is a must.


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SanchoPanza

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Re: cleaning anodes
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2015, 01:30:34 AM »
Ok thanks, just a few volts then.
We should keep them clean anyway, I suppose.

-Sancho

Offline kephra

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Re: cleaning anodes
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2015, 01:43:42 AM »
Yes, you want to keep them clean to keep the particles of silver oxide crystals from falling off and entering the bulk water.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.