Author Topic: Colloidal Silver Color Samples  (Read 29419 times)

Offline dennis51

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 5
  • Likes: 0
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #105 on: March 22, 2020, 06:23:40 PM »
Thanks for showing the color samples. I've recently started making my own using corn syrup as a reducing agent and am lead to believe I'm producing a colloidal silver in the 40 ppm range.

Offline imcool

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 204
  • Likes: 3
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #106 on: April 05, 2020, 03:56:54 PM »
https://www.cgcsforum.org/index.php?topic=5042.msg41694#msg41694



does this look Ok after corn syrup reduction?  please advise.

Offline cfnisbet

  • Administrator
  • Participant
  • *****
  • Posts: 1964
  • Likes: 115
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #107 on: April 05, 2020, 05:25:56 PM »
We can't tell without the amperage and time.

You MUST read the articles, or at least this thread below. Your Colloidal Silver is nowhere near 40 ppm.

https://www.cgcsforum.org/index.php?topic=4965.0

Offline imcool

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 204
  • Likes: 3
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #108 on: April 08, 2020, 11:09:01 PM »
Thanks. I think I am getting decent results as I progress and tweak things more in line with existing articles here. Initially I started out with an eBay simple 2 lead set up. As time goes on, I upgrade my gear and knowledge.

Is there specifically a guide on making higher ppm concentrated batches? I like this 20ppm deal but I think it might be nice to make a more potent ppm one for storage and dilution, or to make taking larger loading doses while sick more convenient than consuming larger quantities of 20ppm perhaps. I have read that 20ppm is pretty much the maximum without special steps or capping or what ever but I don't recall seeing a guide specifically about making high ppm strengths. Do you know of an article which covers this?
Bump!

Offline imcool

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 204
  • Likes: 3
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #109 on: April 08, 2020, 11:10:18 PM »
I see the 'smoke' coming off the cathode (not the anode) when I do my runs. I figured it was gas being produced. When making 320 PPM the gelatin seems to make them (the gas bubbles) linger and get caught up in the vortex. The result is that for about the first half of my 320 PPM runs there is foam on top and swirling around in the vortex.
can you elaborate  more about 320ppm procedure, whats  the main difference in process between both while making 20ppm and 320ppm, many people are wondering including myself.

Offline Neofizz

  • Expert
  • Participant
  • ***
  • Posts: 1035
  • Likes: 42
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #110 on: April 09, 2020, 01:35:08 AM »
I see the 'smoke' coming off the cathode (not the anode) when I do my runs. I figured it was gas being produced. When making 320 PPM the gelatin seems to make them (the gas bubbles) linger and get caught up in the vortex. The result is that for about the first half of my 320 PPM runs there is foam on top and swirling around in the vortex.
can you elaborate  more about 320ppm procedure, whats  the main difference in process between both while making 20ppm and 320ppm, many people are wondering including myself.

There are a couple differences between making 20 ppm and 320 ppm Colloidal Silver.

I make 20 ppm at room temperature while 320 ppm is done 'hot'. 100C is recommended but my little stirring hotplate struggles with that so I've settled on 80C.
Hot gives more time for reduction to occur because you're never near the solubility limit of the silver oxide.

For 20 ppm the reducer is added after electrolysis is complete. For 320 ppm the reducer is added before electrolysis is started.

If you are gel-capping the 20 ppm the gelatin is added after reduction is complete. With 320 ppm the gelatin is added first.

I just finished making a fresh liter/quart of 320 ppm Colloidal Silver. Here are the steps I took:

1. Measure 500 mls of distilled water and add it to my 2 liter beaker and set it on the stirring hotplate (heat on, stirrer off).
2. Measure 500 mls of distilled water and put in microwave set to 4 minutes on high.
3. Add the gelatin to the beaker, lightly sprinkling it in and letting it spread out. Don't make lumps. Let it sit and 'bloom' while the other water is heating. When the bloomed gelatin is sinking and to keep it from sticking to the bottom I turn the stirrer on low.
4. Get boiling water from the microwave, turn stir on high and dump it in. The gelatin will almost instantly dissolve.
5. While waiting for gelatin to finish dissolving I add the 1 ml of 1 M electrolyte and a couple big drops of light corn syrup straight out of the bottle. The corn syrup is the reducer added in excess for efficient reduction. After waiting a minute for it to dissolve I can start.
6. I get the electrodes roughly set up before starting up the SilverTron.
7. Start the SilverTron and set the anode at about half an inch depth (the one ounce silver bar).
8. The copper cathode is slowly lowered in. The lower it goes the higher the voltage climbs. I go with about 20 volts. If I go too low the amperage will start to drop. I'm running with 15 milliamps.
9. When the run is done (5.5 hours later) I immediately pull out the electrodes and turn off the heat but leave it stirring for half an hour.
10. After that I leave it to cool (with the electrode holder/lid on) before filtering, bottling and volume correcting.

There are variations on how this is done. Part of the reason for fire cleaning the anode every 20-60 minutes is that as the 'gunk' builds up the voltage goes down. Some of the 'gunk' also can fall off when my lead footed brother walks by. Might give a bit more Tyndall effect but I'm not so worried about that. If I'm not cleaning during the whole run I'm down about 5 volts by the end and is part of the reason I set it to 20 volts. I can keep adjusting the cathode to keep the voltage up as well. If you can do the frequent fire cleaning you should. I'm just not in a position to do that right now so I've modified to compensate somewhat.

YMMV
"Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle."

Offline gold purifier

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 10
  • Likes: 0
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #111 on: April 10, 2020, 04:11:39 AM »
When I get a chance, I will make a serial dilution of 320 ppm gelatin capped.  I managed to find 5 identical bottles so I can do 320 160 80 40 and 20 ppm.
Mr. Kephra, I am from Brazil and, I produce my colloidal silver, thanks to what I have learned here on the forum however, there are many things that I cannot understand like process for hig ppm so I would like to ask for your help, to get, formulas for higher ppm like, 100 , 200 and higher. I would like to count on your help. thanks in advance.

Offline imcool

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 204
  • Likes: 3
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #112 on: April 10, 2020, 06:27:48 PM »
When I get a chance, I will make a serial dilution of 320 ppm gelatin capped.  I managed to find 5 identical bottles so I can do 320 160 80 40 and 20 ppm.
Mr. Kephra, I am from Brazil and, I produce my colloidal silver, thanks to what I have learned here on the forum however, there are many things that I cannot understand like process for hig ppm so I would like to ask for your help, to get, formulas for higher ppm like, 100 , 200 and higher. I would like to count on your help. thanks in advance.

https://www.cgcsforum.org/index.php?topic=3713.msg41886#msg41886

Offline imcool

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 204
  • Likes: 3
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #113 on: April 10, 2020, 06:56:40 PM »
I see the 'smoke' coming off the cathode (not the anode) when I do my runs. I figured it was gas being produced. When making 320 PPM the gelatin seems to make them (the gas bubbles) linger and get caught up in the vortex. The result is that for about the first half of my 320 PPM runs there is foam on top and swirling around in the vortex.
can you elaborate  more about 320ppm procedure, whats  the main difference in process between both while making 20ppm and 320ppm, many people are wondering including myself.

There are a couple differences between making 20 ppm and 320 ppm colloidal silver.

I make 20 ppm at room temperature while 320 ppm is done 'hot'. 100C is recommended but my little stirring hotplate struggles with that so I've settled on 80C.
Hot gives more time for reduction to occur because you're never near the solubility limit of the silver oxide.

For 20 ppm the reducer is added after electrolysis is complete. For 320 ppm the reducer is added before electrolysis is started.

If you are gel-capping the 20 ppm the gelatin is added after reduction is complete. With 320 ppm the gelatin is added first.

I just finished making a fresh liter/quart of 320 ppm colloidal silver. Here are the steps I took:

1. Measure 500 mls of distilled water and add it to my 2 liter beaker and set it on the stirring hotplate (heat on, stirrer off).
2. Measure 500 mls of distilled water and put in microwave set to 4 minutes on high.
3. Add the gelatin to the beaker, lightly sprinkling it in and letting it spread out. Don't make lumps. Let it sit and 'bloom' while the other water is heating. When the bloomed gelatin is sinking and to keep it from sticking to the bottom I turn the stirrer on low.
4. Get boiling water from the microwave, turn stir on high and dump it in. The gelatin will almost instantly dissolve.
5. While waiting for gelatin to finish dissolving I add the 1 ml of 1 M electrolyte and a couple big drops of light corn syrup straight out of the bottle. The corn syrup is the reducer added in excess for efficient reduction. After waiting a minute for it to dissolve I can start.
6. I get the electrodes roughly set up before starting up the SilverTron.
7. Start the SilverTron and set the anode at about half an inch depth (the one ounce silver bar).
8. The copper cathode is slowly lowered in. The lower it goes the higher the voltage climbs. I go with about 20 volts. If I go too low the amperage will start to drop. I'm running with 15 milliamps.
9. When the run is done (5.5 hours later) I immediately pull out the electrodes and turn off the heat but leave it stirring for half an hour.
10. After that I leave it to cool (with the electrode holder/lid on) before filtering, bottling and volume correcting.

There are variations on how this is done. Part of the reason for fire cleaning the anode every 20-60 minutes is that as the 'gunk' builds up the voltage goes down. Some of the 'gunk' also can fall off when my lead footed brother walks by. Might give a bit more Tyndall effect but I'm not so worried about that. If I'm not cleaning during the whole run I'm down about 5 volts by the end and is part of the reason I set it to 20 volts. I can keep adjusting the cathode to keep the voltage up as well. If you can do the frequent fire cleaning you should. I'm just not in a position to do that right now so I've modified to compensate somewhat.

YMMV

thanks a ton

Offline RedDogJT

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 198
  • Likes: 8
  • Information junkie & autodidact
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #114 on: April 15, 2020, 06:15:32 PM »
Yes. Thanks for that description.  That was one of the final pieces I was not clear on, but now am.
Now I've got to get clear on the PSU's CC vs CV setting.
Nothing is as it seems and nothing is at it appears

Offline Turbidaceous

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 398
  • Likes: 1
  • Living in the UK
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #115 on: April 17, 2020, 05:09:08 PM »
When I make my 1L of 100ppm I always add 1.5 grams of malto instead of the 1.4 recommended by the formula. I just made some 50ppm and used 0.72g of malto which is only 0.2 of a gram more than recommended. When I dilute my 100ppm down to 50ppm it has a bit of an orange tint, whereas the 50ppm I made earlier is just a richer version of yellow, not really orange but just a more richer yellow, like golden colour. I can tell in the full size beaker that the 50ppm I made is a bit darker than 20ppm but when I put 10ml in a sample 50ml beaker and 10ml of the diluted 100ppm in another 50ml beaker, the 10ml of 100ppm which is diluted to 50ppm looks more orangy/gold than the raw 50ppm I made as-is.

I mean the colours are not as rich since the volume of the sample is less. But comparing apples to apples, both small samples are not the same, the diluted 100ppm looks a tad more orange whereas the 50ppm raw is not and looks more like the colour a full kilner jar of 20ppm looks.

Does this make sense what I am trying to convey?

I am heating up my raw 50ppm in case perhaps it had not fully reduced but I doubt that is the case since I left it for a good 40 minutes before sorting it out.

When I make 20ppm raw, it looks weaker in colour when in my beaker I made it in, but when I transfer it to a wider kilner jar, it looks more golden and like everyone else shows pictures of 20ppm, so I know the thinner the vessel, the weaker and less punchy the colour seems to be. But again, comparing a sample of each, there's a clear difference, though not vast difference.

Can someone help me understand what is going on? (I tried to take a picture but it does not show properly like the eye sees.

Offline wgpeters

  • Kephra's other account
  • Expert
  • Participant
  • ***
  • Posts: 634
  • Likes: 75
    • SilverTron Support
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #116 on: April 17, 2020, 07:12:58 PM »
Color indicates particle size.  Orange indicates larger particles or a mixture with larger particles.
And don't obsess with formulas for calculating maltodextrin.  Malto is not a standardized product, and the required amount depends on how the malto was made.  Maltodextrin is a chain of glucose molecules consisting of 3 to 17 glucose molecules in the chain.  Since you don't know the composition of the maltodextrin, you cannot accurately calculate the required amount.

Its best to use too much rather than too little.
A person's worth is solely determined by what he does for others.

Offline Turbidaceous

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 398
  • Likes: 1
  • Living in the UK
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #117 on: April 17, 2020, 07:33:24 PM »
What would lead to slightly larger particle size? I use the same method every time. Usually when I dilute to 20ppm it looks perfect every time I have done that comparison. But for some reason making 50ppm directly compared with half watered down 100ppm do not look identical. Very weird. I did heat it up again in case it was not fully reduced but it did not really make any change I could notice.

Might I have screwed up the dilution by a small amount? I mean yes colour is particle size, but same particle size but more ppm leads to darker and darker shades, naturally my 100ppm is a tea/red colour when I look through it outside into the sun-lit backyard. Then when I dilute to 20ppm it looks the same as when I make 20ppm directly. So perhaps either I made the 100ppm batch slightly more strong by a few ppm and maybe eye-balled my half and half not accurately enough? If I am mixing 500ml of Zero water (tested @ 000) with 500ml of 100ppm only by eyeballing by the height of the bottle, would that level of margin of error (visually looks half and half) be enough to make a detectable colour-shade difference?

Offline Turbidaceous

  • Participant
  • **
  • Posts: 398
  • Likes: 1
  • Living in the UK
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #118 on: April 18, 2020, 05:05:13 PM »
I just made a fresh batch of 100ppm and diluted half and half with more pure water and compared 20ml of each final side by side. My 50ppm I made the other day is lighter in colour still. I must have done something wrong and miscalculated something some how somewhere. I thought it looked a bit pale but I put 50ppm in my spreadsheet and left it going for the allotted time. I just must have done something wrong with that batch. Though what, I cannot figure out.

Which looks like 50ppm? The right one is half and half diluted 100ppm to get to 50 and the left one is actual (supposed to be...) 50ppm as I made it.



Left one 48 minutes @ 15.7ma (60+ degree C temp) 0.7g malto 20 drops of electrolyte.

Right one started off at 1 hour 36 minutes @ 15.7ma (60+ degree C temp) 1.52g malto and 20 drops of electrolyte and then left for a few mins after completion and diluting 10ml of it with 10ml pure water.

To my mind they should be identical colour. 50ppm vs diluted 100ppm. Yet they are not the same colour. I would appreciate some possible ideas of what happened and which colour looks right for 50ppm?

Could it be that my malto needed more than the recommended by the formula? I always add an extra 100+mg than recommended when I do my 100ppm but for my 50ppm I kept it to the letter of the formula. Would it have reduced more or something and gone darker? Does that mean my 50ppm as-made is not fully reduced? I am trying to come up with reasons why it would be lighter than every other batch of 100ppm I have diluted as a test, they all come out like the one on the right, a bit orange.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2020, 05:16:18 PM by Turbidaceous »

Offline cfnisbet

  • Administrator
  • Participant
  • *****
  • Posts: 1964
  • Likes: 115
Re: Colloidal Silver Color Samples
« Reply #119 on: April 18, 2020, 06:38:41 PM »
If the timing was right, in theory they should be the same colour. If I was forced to guess, I would say the one on the right is closer to my rendering of 50 ppm. Both good batches though.