Author Topic: Reducing Ionic Silver to Colloidal Silver  (Read 85 times)

Offline Teach

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Reducing Ionic Silver to Colloidal Silver
« on: January 29, 2019, 08:40:56 PM »
Hello all, I've read everything that looked like it might provide the answer to this but can't find it. Can anyone provide a link or info on what the best temperature to bring the ionic silver up to when reducing it to colloidal silver?

Also, I appear to be getting silver deposits on the interior walls of glass jar being used for the electrolyses process. Good Bad? Doesn't matter? tnx.

Offline wgpeters

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Re: Reducing Ionic Silver to Colloidal Silver
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2019, 09:18:45 PM »
There is no specific temperature.  I often just do it at room temperature (70F).  How long it takes depends on both temperature and how much reducing agent you used.

If you are getting silver deposits on the bottom of your flask, you are using too much current or not enough stirring.  You should remove it with hydrogen peroxide, then rinse well to remove the peroxide.  It is unwanted because it creates a 3rd electrode.
wgpeters aka Kephra

Offline Teach

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Re: Reducing Ionic Silver to Colloidal Silver
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2019, 05:23:18 PM »
WGpeters, I think you hit the nail on the head with the plating affect on the inside of the glass vessel. I later inspected the circuitry and discovered I had placed a resistor in parallel instead of in series essentially making it's function non working. I then did another run after rewiring the resistor and let it run for an hour with all the same parameters ie electrolyte and neutralizing. Color was much lighter and seemed to have much more clarity than the previous batches I had be running at only 30 minutes. In fact it had very little color at all until after neutralizing. If my theory is correct @ 30volts with a total load of 5.4k I should be right around 5.5 milliamps (.005 amps) now which should be ideal for 20ppm @ one hour run time.
I'll do another batch from scratch using a new clean glass vessel to determine if the current decrease has solved the problem.

Re the Neutralizing; I have been doing a boiling water bath for the receiving jar and ionic silver in it. I ad my neutralizer while the jar is still on the stirrer/hotplate then remove it and move to the hot water bath and bring the temperature of the ionic silver up to 140 degrees F. At that point I shut off the heat and let it cool, then filter the now colloidal silver through a coffee filter......tho this step has never really proven to be needed based on the lack of material found on the filter afterwards.

Is 140 F. sufficient? Too much? Total time on the burner from room temp only takes about 20 minutes and it's done and up to a 140 degree F. temperature. Nice clear golden color.

Offline wgpeters

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Re: Reducing Ionic Silver to Colloidal Silver
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2019, 05:46:54 PM »
Quote
Neutralize
  I think you mean 'reduce'.

Quote
If my theory is correct @ 30volts with a total load of 5.4k I should be right around 5.5 milliamps (.005 amps) now which should be ideal for 20ppm @ one hour run time.
Did you account for the cell resistance?  You really need to measure the current every batch to account for cell resistance variations.

There is no special temperature to reduce silver.  Hotter equals faster, thats about it.
wgpeters aka Kephra

Offline Teach

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Re: Reducing Ionic Silver to Colloidal Silver
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2019, 09:48:53 PM »
Correct, sorry I did mean reduce.

And yes cell was taken into account with 2.7k ohms and the resistor of equal value totaling 5.4 k ohms. And potential voltage between cathode and anode is just under 14 volts.