Author Topic: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid  (Read 1032 times)

Offline waboni

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2020, 12:49:22 AM »
Okay I signed up and looks like there is a $50 credit referral waiting for you.
So where do I find the lid?

I just shared a quoted design with you over the Xometry platform, when checking out, please select the option to use your "credits".

waboni
« Last Edit: May 03, 2020, 12:41:59 AM by waboni »

Offline bcboy

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2020, 12:23:38 AM »
Okay I signed up and looks like there is a $50 credit referral waiting for you.
So where do I find the lid?

So how did your lid turn out? Did the $50 credit referral work for you?
:D One day at a time.

Offline Gene

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #17 on: July 02, 2020, 01:21:53 AM »
Is the material you're using certified for food use?  You will get water condensation on the inside while the cell is running while heating.  IF enough it will drip back into your cell water.  If its not food use certified, it could pick up stuff you really don't want in the Colloidal Silver.


Offline SaltyCornflakes

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2020, 11:35:11 AM »
These plastics work for 3D printing because they are heat sensitive and heat malleable. This is NOT the material you want to bring in contact with constant +90°c steam. If you only produce your Colloidal Silver cold, then it may be okay.

Cut it out of a piece of stainless steel if you have some available. Or use glass or ceramics.

Offline cfnisbet

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2020, 09:02:29 PM »
I don't know if it is the same plastic, but the beaker lids we (and in particular Kephra) make are cut or turned from polythene kitchen cutting boards.

These are about as food-friendly as you can get, I would have thought. I myself use polythene grating of the type used for covering guttering (to stop leaves blocking the gutters).

Offline Gene

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #20 on: July 03, 2020, 03:16:05 AM »
HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) is what cutting boards are made of. Its TOUGH, HARD and relatively heat resistant and guaranteed food contact certified.  Other food grade plastics, not so much.

You might be able to get a scrap piece large enough from a plastics supplier. They might even cut it to size for you though I doubt they'd make it round but its worth asking.

HDPE is what I'm going to use when I get around to doing it. Years ago I got about 1/2" thick HDPE sheet scraps. I'm going to cut a circular piece, drill 2 holes for the electrodes, route a circular channel in the bottom side thats half as deep as the sheet thickness which matches the top lip of the mason jar so it won't accidentally get pushed off while the cell is running.

For the electrode holders, I was going to screw (you can't glue this stuff together) a square of the same material over each hole, drill all the way through using the holes already in the lid as guides and then drill another hole from one of the sides to the center hole of both pieces, thread it and use a set-screw to hold the electrodes.  I can then just alligator clip  the wires or if you prefer, you can use a stainless screw instead of a set screw and just round/smooth the end so it doesn't cut into the wire and choose a long enough length that once the wire is secured, there's maybe 1/2-3/4" sticking out so you can clip your alligator clips to it.

It doesn't have to be fancy - just work and be reliable.

The other problem with 3d printed items is that due to the nature of how 3d printing works, they're NOT waterproof.  There are gaps between the slices and these can pick up dirt and stuff and also absorb water and thats just asking for trouble.

BTW, plexiglass is not food safe.  The reason being that when they react the methylmethacrylate monomer to turn it into solid polymer, the reaction leaves some unreacted monomer and its not so good if it gets into your body.  This is why you don't see food grade plexiglass items.

The acrylic they use in some plastic cups,... is something different.

Offline bcboy

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #21 on: July 03, 2020, 06:00:18 AM »
Here is what I am going to use. I should be able to make 2 lids with a 5" hole saw. Then use the table saw to make dado or rabbit joint on the lid. Or maybe use the table saw for the whole process.
https://youtu.be/6TCFzoRVo1k
Winco - CBWT-610 - 6 in x 10 in x 1/2 in White Cutting Board.
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Winco-CBWT-610-6-in-x-10-in-x-1-2-in-White-Cutting-Board/138169192?athcpid=138169192&athpgid=athenaItemPage&athcgid=null&athznid=PWVUB&athieid=v0&athstid=CS004&athguid=4522ab97-007-17312cea5f8dc1&athancid=null&athena=true


:D One day at a time.

Offline Gene

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #22 on: July 03, 2020, 07:30:50 AM »
OMG! Thats gonna break the bank (wink). NO, its not that big but big enough and for sure cheap enough. It says its polyethylene so for sure its HDPE.

The corners you cut off for making a circle are probably going to be big enough to make those electrode holders I spoke of so don't chuck them - use them. Yeah, you'll have to cut them into squares but thats not that hard.  You could even cut the squares out after tracing the circle outlines before cutting the circles. That might even be simpler because now you're not cutting up slivers of plastic. You're cutting them out of a bigger sheet which will be much easier to do. Sometimes (most times) sequence matters.

Do post photos of the results. I'm sure we'd all love to see them.

Offline waboni

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #23 on: July 05, 2020, 03:24:30 AM »
Okay I signed up and looks like there is a $50 credit referral waiting for you.
So where do I find the lid?

So how did your lid turn out? Did the $50 credit referral work for you?

Hi bcboy, I'm sorry for responding this late.
Yes it worked, here are some pictures of the SLS laser printed lid and how it fits my current production setup:

waboni


« Last Edit: July 05, 2020, 03:56:46 AM by waboni »

Offline bcboy

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #24 on: July 05, 2020, 04:24:50 AM »
Holy that looks GREAT...... :D
:D One day at a time.

Offline waboni

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #25 on: July 05, 2020, 06:16:31 AM »
Is the material you're using certified for food use?  You will get water condensation on the inside while the cell is running while heating.  IF enough it will drip back into your cell water.  If its not food use certified, it could pick up stuff you really don't want in the Colloidal Silver.

Dear Gene, according to FDA Regulations CFR 21, I found this.

"Sec. 177.1500 Nylon resins.
The nylon resins listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used to produce articles intended for use in processing, handling, and packaging food, subject to the provisions of this section:
...
(9) Nylon 12 resins are manufactured by the condensation of omega- laurolactam."

While most SLS powders are graded food safe, the particles on the surface of printed parts might not fuse completely, resulting in parts that are inherently porous and do not deal well with moisture and mold growth.

Nylon 12 offers a good strength, durability, chemical resistance and good heat deflection temperatures (HDT of 177°C)

So, for just $12.88 I paid for shipping (promo credit didn't covered that) I believe you can't go wrong.

There is another printing methods like FDM with ULTEM 1010 material, that will be food certified but it is very expensive, about $162.21.



Offline bcboy

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #26 on: July 06, 2020, 12:36:00 AM »
Okay I signed up and looks like there is a $50 credit referral waiting for you.
So where do I find the lid?

So how did your lid turn out? Did the $50 credit referral work for you?

Hi bcboy, I'm sorry for responding this late.
Yes it worked, here are some pictures of the SLS laser printed lid and how it fits my current production setup:

waboni

So what was the total cost with shipping did you pay out of pocket?
:D One day at a time.

Offline waboni

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Re: 3D Printing of Production Vessel Lid
« Reply #27 on: July 06, 2020, 01:16:21 AM »
Okay I signed up and looks like there is a $50 credit referral waiting for you.
So where do I find the lid?

So how did your lid turn out? Did the $50 credit referral work for you?

Hi bcboy, I'm sorry for responding this late.
Yes it worked, here are some pictures of the SLS laser printed lid and how it fits my current production setup:

waboni

So what was the total cost with shipping did you pay out of pocket?

I only paid for shipping, at that time it was $12.88.

Please be aware that 3d printing is just for the lid, the two female banana jacks (black and red) as well as the knurled thumb screw should be purchased separately (this one is only needed if your hot-plate comes with a probe).
« Last Edit: July 06, 2020, 01:23:50 AM by waboni »