Author Topic: What color should 100 and 500 ppm silver be?  (Read 67 times)

Offline apyr

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What color should 100 and 500 ppm silver be?
« on: July 31, 2020, 02:08:41 AM »
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Offline cfnisbet

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Re: What color should 100 and 500 ppm silver be?
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2020, 02:01:10 PM »
Dark brown for 100 ppm, very dark brown (almost verging on black - like used motor oil) for 500 ppm and above.

Offline bcboy

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Re: What color should 100 and 500 ppm silver be?
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2020, 05:04:07 PM »
Here are some color samples I made over the years.

Gelatin Capped Silver Dilutions.
Left to right: 320 160 80 40 20 ppm

:D One day at a time.

Offline cfnisbet

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Re: What color should 100 and 500 ppm silver be?
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2020, 08:05:54 AM »
Perfect pictures.

Offline Gene

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Re: What color should 100 and 500 ppm silver be?
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2020, 04:35:14 AM »
Remember that gel capping will make the color look a bit darker due to the light scattering introduced by the gelatine.  Using different reducing agents has an effect on color too - malto reduced is darker than karo reduced,... and with the added gelatine, a bit darker for any given PPM.

Until you get the hang of it, once the reduction is done before you add the gelatine, take a small amount (half a tablespoon or so - thats 1/2 US oz liquid) and dilute it down to 20PPM and have a good look see to ascertain if it looks about the right color.

Glass can also affect color.  Mason jars for instance are made with a glass that once you add water to them, it comes up a little yellowish.  They're also not square so there is a magnifying effect which messes with color too. Its cheap soda glass. Its not borosilicate labware.  They compensate to give it the heat handling it needs for pressure cooking by making the glass thicker which also influences appearance. So until you get used to what artifacts the glass you're processing in contributes, diluting a small amount to 20PPM to check is a safe bet.

Making Colloidal Silver isn't hard. There's a slight learning curve and you, depending on your choice of reducer and whether or not you're gel capping, have to learn what the correct color is for each different PPM you make.