Author Topic: CG color  (Read 6201 times)

bsilverman444

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #15 on: July 29, 2012, 04:26:15 PM »
I decided to experiment further with cinnamon extract. I poured off about a cup of cg from the larger batch and heated it to just boiling and began adding more cinnamon. The photo below shows a very slight increase in darkness. The bottle is from the original brew.

 1st glass on the left, i added 1 ml cinnamon to the heated solution then poured into the glass.

 2nd glass had 2 ml more added,

 3rd glass another 2 ml  (6ml)

 4th glass had a total of about 10 ml added.

It would appear that it doesnt make a lot of difference to the color, how much more cinnamon is added.

The taste is not effected either for me.  Those who dont like the cinnamon taste may have a different take on that.

Would appreciate any conclusions from the pros.

Offline cfnisbet

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #16 on: July 29, 2012, 05:19:59 PM »
My only comment is that it looks as if you've got the process spot-on!

Offline kephra

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #17 on: July 29, 2012, 06:05:57 PM »
Quote
It would appear that it doesnt make a lot of difference to the color, how much more cinnamon is added.
It shouldn't make a lot of difference.  Making the extract is an inexact procedure though, as the cinnamon itself may vary in strength, and there is a difference between water extraction and alcohol extraction.  So you may need more cinnamon than I do for those reasons.    Its better to have too much than to have too little.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

Offline mraluma415

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2012, 07:44:03 PM »
You have a great batch!  I use cinnamon only for both my colloidal silver and colloidal gold. I noticed for colloidal silver in 1000 mL it only takes 4 drops of cinnamon to completely reduce. When I compare 4 drops with a batch that has 16 drops, the color is the same. With colloidal gold I have noticed that more is needed with 1000mL. I think its important to use more reducing agent than less especially with my Gold Chloride process, since you dont want to have any Gold Chloride left over. If one doesnt like the taste, you can put it through a Brita water filter and it filters out the flavor quite a bit. I have been wondering if the microwave, after making a batch, has the ability to reduce nano-particles, I have yet to try it?  Keep up the good work!

I think another factor you may want to record in your observations is "turbidity". Is the turbidity less when more cinnamon is added? is the pink a sign of less turbidity and smaller particles? Also I agree with Kephra that if not enough salt is used you end up converting less of the gold chloride to metallic particles. These water filters are great when you finish because the seem to get alot of the left over sediments out of the solution before your ready to drink up!

Cheers!
"The art of healing comes from nature, not from the physician. Therefore the physician must start from nature, with an open mind." - Paracelsus

Offline kephra

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #19 on: July 29, 2012, 07:50:30 PM »
Quote
If one doesnt like the taste, you can put it through a Brita water filter and it filters out the flavor quite a bit.
Wow, thats a good tip!  I didn't know whether it would filter out the gold or not.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

bsilverman444

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2012, 08:33:53 PM »
You have a great batch!  I use cinnamon only for both my colloidal silver and colloidal gold. I noticed for colloidal silver in 1000 mL it only takes 4 drops of cinnamon to completely reduce. When I compare 4 drops with a batch that has 16 drops, the color is the same. With colloidal gold I have noticed that more is needed with 1000mL. I think its important to use more reducing agent than less especially with my Gold Chloride process, since you dont want to have any Gold Chloride left over. If one doesnt like the taste, you can put it through a Brita water filter and it filters out the flavor quite a bit. I have been wondering if the microwave, after making a batch, has the ability to reduce nano-particles, I have yet to try it?  Keep up the good work!

I think another factor you may want to record in your observations is "turbidity". Is the turbidity less when more cinnamon is added? is the pink a sign of less turbidity and smaller particles? Also I agree with Kephra that if not enough salt is used you end up converting less of the gold chloride to metallic particles. These water filters are great when you finish because the seem to get alot of the left over sediments out of the solution before your ready to drink up!

Cheers!

Thanks.  BTW, i reported that the color turned toward a pinkish color, i would like modify that to say purplish!

I was watching turbidity and found more cinnamon made no difference at all.

There is also zero sediment.

I'm am trying to remember if gold chloride is made when using electrolysis. If so, then yes, more cinnamon would be better.  That would be the concern about salt as well. But doesnt salt just make the process quicker, not make more gold chloride?

So long as all the gold coming off the electrode is being reduced, then i'm not loosing anything. Right?

Offline kephra

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #21 on: July 29, 2012, 09:44:48 PM »
Salt plus electricity produces gold chloride.  Cinnamon or citrate reduces the gold chloride to metal again.

More salt increases the speed of gold chloride production.

When making gold,  there are initially three separate processes going on:
Electrolysis of sodium chloride which makes gold chloride plus sodium hydroxide
Electrolysis of cinnamon phenols
Electrolysis of sodium citrate which produces more sodium hydroxide plus citric acid.

After the initial fraction of a second electrolysis of sodium hydroxide ramps up.

So now there are four processes occurring.

If we start out with equal amounts of reagents, only 1/3rd of the current is making AuCl from sodium chloride.  However each molecule of AuCl made leaves less sodium chloride, so then there is less than 1/3rd of the reactions making gold chloride.  The result is that gold chloride production gets slower and slower as the process runs.  This is why we cannot calculate ppm from current and time.
Colloidal Silver is only a bargain if you make it yourself.

bsilverman444

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #22 on: July 29, 2012, 09:51:01 PM »
Ok thanks, that is helpful toward understanding the process.

So i correctly understood that the gold chloride is produced.

The rest of it isnt quite as clear to me, and i am not sure i need to understand it fully for now.

I will keep studying and experimenting.

Offline mraluma415

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Re: Colloidal Gold color
« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2012, 05:15:49 AM »
I was curious as well if the gold would be filtered out, or even the reducing agent. Im looking to get a millipore vacuum flask setup to filter my solutions to see what happens. I am curious as to whether the nano particles pass through the filter with the reducing agent attached or if the carbon separates the sugar from the electrons. So far it seems pretty stable. I cannot seem to get rid of floaties in my colloidal silver and colloidal gold no matter how many carbon filters and coffe filters I put it through, so I';m going for the pro setup. Ant suggestions on millipore filters, there are many substrates?

Another random piece of info that is interesting and completely off topic, i froze my colloidal silver that was made with sodium carbonate  and cinnamon, froze it to show my mother it wasnt dyed and to my surprise it melted back into its stable form and was still yellow. there were some peppered partilces on the bottom, I would say 50% loss. not bad!
"The art of healing comes from nature, not from the physician. Therefore the physician must start from nature, with an open mind." - Paracelsus